When hula dancing the stories of the Hawaiian Islands of gods, humans and nature with the entire body, but especially with the hands are telling.
The ancient Hula dance "Hula Kahiko" is, in combination with the corresponding songs ("Mele") and chants ("Oli"), the form in which the history and stories passed on from generation to generation of Hawai'i was.
From 1820 until the missionaries came to Hawai'i, namely the Hawaiians had no writing. To follow all the stories were handed down by the story of creation stories about gods to everyday stories about songs and dances. "Hula" is nothing more than "dancing" in Hawaiian.
King David Kalakaua (1836 - 1891) has called the Hula heartbeat of the Hawaiian people. Through its commitment to the hula dance was officially allowed after several decades of suppression by the missionaries about 1880 and again revived. At the same time, "Hula Auana", the modern hula, was born. That is the playful, light, cheerful manner, hula dancing, which is usually associated with hula with us.
Both styles of dance, the old and the modern is danced by both women and men, with the old style "strict" and is accompanied only by spoken rather than sung lyrics in Hawaiian language and simple percussion instruments.
When Hula watch - or even better - hula dancing makes you happy!

Hawaiian Hula dance

Hula - the danced language of Hawai'i

HulaIn the Hula dance the stories of gods, humans and nature of the Hawaiian islands are told with the entire body, but especially with the hands.

The ancient Hula dance, "Hula Kahiko", in combination with the corresponding songs ("Mele") or chants ("Oli"), is the form in which the history and stories of Hawai'i were passed on from generation to generation.

The Hawaiians had no literary language until the missionaries came to Hawai'i in about 1820. Therefore all the stories, from the story of creation to stories about gods and to everyday stories, were handed down through songs and dances. "Hula" in Hawaiian means nothing else but "dance".

King David Kalakaua (1836 - 1891) has called Hula "the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people". Through his commitment the Hula dance was officially allowed and revided again in about 1880, after several decades of suppression by the missionaries. At the same time, "Hula Auana", the modern hula, was born. This is the playful, light, cheerful manner of dancing Hula, which we usually associated with Hula.

Both styles of dance, the ancient and the modern, are danced by both, women and men, whereupon the old style is "stricter" and accompanied only by spoken rather than sung lyrics in Hawaiian language and simple percussion instruments.

Watching - or even better - dancing Hula simply makes you happy!

Hula lessons

I started teaching Hula in 2013 and currently teach in five different VHS (adult education centers) throughout Vienna and Lower Austria. Here you can find the current dates for workshops and courses.

Furthermore I teach Hula on request individually and in small groups, if you can inspire some friends (also men are very welcome!). Please contact me by email or phone (+43 699 19424297).

If you're interested in booking a workshop or course, please let me know, but also think of your registration at the respective VHS, if you want to participate at a lesson organized by them (see schedule).

My personal hula-history

I came across Hula through my Lomi Lomi Nui training and keep learning this beautiful dance since 2008. My most famous Hawaiian Hula teachers are: Puna Kalama Dawson, Frank Kawaikapuokalani Hewett (Loea) and Keali'i Reichel. In 2010 and 2011 I was able to experience Hula directly in Hawai'i. Since December 2009, I had public performances in various celebrations and in theaters from the "Smallest Theater in Vienna" (in 2010) to the "Theater Akzent" (in 2016 and 2018).

I love to perform - alone, in two or with up to seven "Hula Sistahs" - also at your event (eg birthday party or wedding).

Click here to view some photos and here for sample videos.